Precision Cataract Surgery

What is a Cataract?

A #cataract affects the eye’s natural lens;  when we are born the natural eye lens accommodates microscopically allow us to see at near, distance and intermediate. As we being to age in life, the eyes lens slowly stops its movement, and *presbyopia occurs first, then the cataract is formed; this may take up to 15 years to fully develop.

How is a Cataract treated?

Early stages of cataracts may be treated with new *progressive, *anti-glare glasses, being in well-lit areas may help. As the cataract begins to mature and the vision starts to decline, glasses will no longer improve vision, cataract surgery is required.

What is Precision Cataract Surgery  

Precision Cataract Surgery is laser technology referred to as “Femtosecond Laser,” and Brian M. Brown, M.D., first offered these treatments to his patients in 2012, making him the first surgeon in Downey, Ca and among the first surgeons in Southern California.

The Femtosecond Laser applies laser energy in an extremely short time-frame, one trillionth of a second eliminating significant heat; therefore it is a “Cool” laser.  The laser-guided by an advanced imaging system known as *OCT (Ocular Coherence Tomography) creates a precise incision without the use of a blade performed manually by hand. The laser is also used to make corneal incisions to reduce and in some cases eliminate *astigmatism.

Definitions:

  • Presbyopia:
  • Progressive lenses
  • Anti-glare
  • OCT
  • Astigmatism

Ophthalmologists are the most highly trained and revered practitioners in the field of eye care. The difference between an ophthalmologist and an optometrist is commonly not understood.  Ophthalmologists are fully licensed medical doctors who have had at least 8 years of medical training. Following medical school, ophthalmologists undergo a four-year residency, giving them the skill to diagnose and treat eye diseases. In addition, they can perform complex surgery on the eye to repair a host of conditions such as detached retina, cataracts, LASIK/PRK and glaucoma procedures, just to name a few.